New Toyota C-HR Sales Soar

South Africa isn’t a place most people would associate with Toyota, but change could very well be in the wind if the new C-HR has anything to say about it. The SUV more than tripled its original sales target, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Other models in Toyota’s SUV lineup are seeing rising sales as well.

The new Toyota C-HR is an SUV that’s seen a massive jump in sales. The standard 1.2-liter turbocharged engine and sleek styling has made it a popular model among South African drivers. The new model saw an incredible 11,055 units sold in March 2017, its first month on the market. That’s given it a major boost toward the top of the small SUV segment.

The Toyota Fortuner isn’t doing too badly either. The model dominated the competition to land at the top spot of the large SUV segment. A total of 1,312 units left dealership lots.

On top of that, the Toyota RAV4, a model American drivers are more than familiar with, saw sales increase to 640 units for the month.

Such incredible sales gains across the board have resulted in Toyota to take 22.8% of the market share, making the Japanese automaker the leader for the first quarter of the year.

We at Capital Toyota are pumped to see the new C-HR doing so well

 

Easter Traditions

Many Americans celebrate the Easter holiday with egg hunts, edible marshmallow birds, and a giant bunny. While they’re common traditions today, their origins aren’t quite as well known. The traditions themselves are interesting and their stories only add to the appeal. Here are the origin stories of a few popular Easter traditions.

Easter Eggs

Many ancient societies used the egg to represent the coming of spring and as a religious symbol of the resurrection. Painting the eggs red began in the thirteenth century and served as a symbol of the blood of Christ.

Easter Bunny

Someone in a giant rabbit suit can be quite the odd sight, but not on Easter! The Easter bunny dates back to the 1700s with German settlers. They would create nests for rabbits, then wait for an Easter Eve rabbit to lay eggs.

Peeps

More than two billion small, edible, marshmallow birds are produced each year and over 75 percent are made specifically for the Easter holiday. Even more interesting, nearly 33 % aren’t actually eaten.

Their origination starts with a man with the name Sam Born, who opened a marshmallow candy factory in the early 1900s. He then moved to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The first marshmallow peep was made by squeezing marshmallow through pastry tubes in the 1950s.

Happy Easter from us here at Capital Toyota, however you celebrate it!