Toyota Tundra: 20 Years and Counting

This year, the Toyota Tundra marks a major milestone — its 20th birthday. Here at Capital Toyota, we’re saluting this beloved truck with a look at highlights from its first two decades.

Assembled in the U.S.

The Tundra was the first full-size pickup from a Japanese automaker to be built in the United States. After several years in Indiana, Tundra production moved to Texas in 2008, where it’s still going strong today.

Out-of-this-world capabilities

The Tundra’s impressive capabilities include the strength to haul close to a ton of cargo or tow up to 7,200 pounds. This muscle was on full display in 2012, when an unmodified Tundra CrewMax 4×4 towed the retired Endeavour space shuttle across a Los Angeles bridge using a special dolly.

Daring durability

For the past 20 years, the Tundra has become justly famous for its toughness and durability. Tundra owner Victor Sheppard racked up more than 1 million miles on his 2007 model, then exchanged it for a new one so Toyota engineers could study how it lasted so long. Tundra toughness was also on display during 2018’s deadly Camp Fire in California, when ICU nurse Allyn Pierce repeatedly drove his truck through the flames to save people trapped in a hospital.

Whether your next Tundra is destined for big accomplishments or simple everyday reliability, you can find a model that’s right for you at Capital Toyota.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana Produces 4 Millionth Vehicle

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana (TMMI) is celebrating a new production milestone after rolling its four millionth vehicle off the assembly line.

The car was a Blizzard Pearl (a fancy term for white) Highlander Hybrid, which in a way represented more than just the plant’s production capabilities, but also the evolution of the Toyota vehicle.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana

When TMMI was first opened, nearly 19 years ago, it was producing Toyota’s first full-size pickup truck—the Tundra. In that time, it also started building the Sequoia full-size SUV and Sienna minivan, before shifting the Tundra’s production over to San Antonio, Texas, and replacing it with the Highlander and Highlander Hybrid midsize SUVs.

Four million vehicles is no small feat. To put that number in perspective, there are about 3,980,000 passenger vehicles registered in Indiana, which means the manufacturing plant has built more cars than are registered in its home state.

Fortunately, not all of those cars stay in the state. Some of those make their way to Capital Toyota for the rest of us to enjoy!